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Professional Development Units

Posted By Cinder McDonald, Friday, March 1, 2019
 

As Certification Committee Coordinator, I would like to take the time to provide clarification on PDU entries.

 

1.       PDUs are to be earned + logged within the calendar year.

 

2.       Any PDU entry greater than 3 PDU credits requires appropriate back-up documentation.

a.       Appropriate back-up documentation might be, the event / meeting invite or agenda or notes. Appropriate back-up should show details of the event / meeting, the content, and the time accounted for.

b.       Certificates of completion are perfect back-up documentation.

 

3.       CPEs are encouraged to place a reminder in their calendar, and enter PDU credits on a monthly basis as earned.  This will help to streamline the process and reduce stress that is created when entering last minute credits during Renewal time.

 

Again, the Certification Team is always available vie email at Certification@ASPEnational.org for questions or concerns.

 

 

Cinder McDonald

Certification Committee Coordinator

Tags:  certification 

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Historical Data

Posted By Rick Cormier, Wednesday, February 27, 2019
 

What are some of the ways you collect historic data?  Is it an elaborate database, simple spreadsheet or just updating your estimating software?  Or do you feel that it's not important since changes frequently?  Just curious to how others view this. 

 

Rick Cormier

Standards Committee

Tags:  standards 

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Reducing Defaults

Posted By Peter Hamilton, Monday, February 25, 2019
 

https://axaxl.com/fast-fast-forward/articles/what-were-you-thinking_an-exploration-of-human-bias-in-subcontractor-selection

 

In reading this article, I am not sure I agree they have it all covered.  As estimators, we may say we have a bias because we have worked with a company or an individual who joined a new company.  However, the part I feel this is lacking in is a validation of scope.  In our career we spend a good amount of time reviewing and defining what it takes to build a building.  I think this is an informative article but lacks the very notion that an estimator has taken off and validated a scope of work, reviewed that scope, and agreed to it with the subcontractor.

 

What do you think?  Does a Risk Engineer really understand all that goes into the process for contracting? What can we do better to help each other at all levels get our scope right and avoid the increase in defaults that has been occurring?

 

Your feedback is important to this process.

 

Peter Hamilton, CPE

Education Committee

Chapter 61 - Philadelphia

Tags:  education 

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Starting A New Chapter

Posted By M. John Shampton, Friday, February 22, 2019
 

What are the steps for Chapter start-up?  We have a great location for a new chapter.  We have had members try to drum up interest in the past, but nothing has become of it.  We have even held a regional meeting there. 

 

What have you done in the past?   How did you start a new chapter?   What worked for you?  What made your chapter successful?

 

 

M. John Shampton, CPE

Certification Committee

Tags:  certification 

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Key Performance Indicators

Posted By Peter Hamilton, Wednesday, February 20, 2019
 

https://www.constructiondive.com/news/the-7-kpis-of-construction-and-how-technology-can-measure-them/542031/

 

Key Performance Indicators, or KPIs, is a term associated with Lean and manufacturing.  The concept of being able to understand your metrics, define them, and determine whether you are hitting your potential or lagging behind.  As we move toward a more data rich and driven work environment, KPIs seem to have become all the rage.  However, I can't help but think about all the data we as estimators have been given and analyze to determine our budgets and bid pricing.

 

Labor production, material availability, escalation, project staffing; all of these are forms of KPIs that we use to set the benchmark for our projects to be on schedule and within our budget.  It is my opinion that we, as estimators, should undertake this new data driven construction process.  We are already responsible for the initial pursuit and setting the stage for a successful project.  Should we not also accept the responsibility of how the new age of data is being used?

 

If we are going to be the managers of this data and information, we need to not just understand what we are asking for and collecting, but the various technologies that we have at our fingertips and where those technologies are going in the future.

 

What are the various technologies your firm is using for data collection? Are you using any specific Artificial Intelligence to enable more data collection? 

 

Peter Hamilton, CPE

Education Committee

Chapter 61 - Philadelphia

Tags:  education 

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Building Connected

Posted By Rick Cormier, Monday, February 18, 2019
 

Is anyone else using Building Connected for sending out bid invitations?  If you're not, you should give it a shot.  I love how I can create/customize bid packages and bid forms for the sub-contractor to use and complete.  I find that having a specific bid form for each packages allows me to speed up the process of scoping out each sub.  The bid form also allows me to level each sub-contractor for a better apples-to-apples comparison.   Building Connected also has other functions like project analysis, bid board and qualifications to mention a few. 

 

 

Rick Cormier

Standards Committee

 

Tags:  standards 

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Accelerated Schedules

Posted By Ken Horner, Friday, February 15, 2019
 

How is one to figure the added cost of an accelerated schedule on man power productivity.  Also during times of inclement weather.  There are books on each of these subject, but it is often difficult to calculate.

 

We typically use past experience from other jobs.  My experience indicates that productivity goes down when you have to load up on manpower. 

 

Does anyone have any better ideas?

 

 

Ken Horner, CPE

Certification Committee

Tags:  certification 

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ConsensusDocs

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, February 13, 2019
 

The ConsensusDocs Coalition ended 2018 strong with 3,400+ subscribers and 2,500+ collaborators. In 2018, two industry first documents were released: ConsensusDocs 541 Design-Assist Addendum and ConsensusDocs 305 Lean Construction Addendum.

 

In 2019, ConsensusDocs will be launching a new website with the goal of creating a better user experience for subscribers and easier to access resources for the industry. The ConsensusDocs Content Advisory Council will be considering adoption of a Master Subcontract Agreement for publication at its next meeting.  

 

Looking forward, a working group to revise ConsensusDocs’ bond forms will be created, and a working group to create residential contracts will also reconvene in 2019.  If you have any questions about ConsensusDocs, contact Amy Hager at ahager@consensusdocs.org.  

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Bid Forms, Bid Packages, Scope Letters and Bid Leveling

Posted By Richard Miller, Wednesday, February 13, 2019
I am finding that the use of Bid Forms, Bid Packages, Scope Letters and Bid Leveling, seams to becoming a lost art. So, the question is if fewer and fewer of those entering the construction industry intent on becoming a PM, have experience in estimating how is the proper preparation of a Scope Letter being taught? Often these PM wannabes have been put on a career path and are taught by those who have not learned how to properly estimate a project and/or do not take the time to properly prepare and execute to close on a bid. Most PM's I note these days simply take the easy way, they invariably reach-out to a favorite sub trade and have them provide a quote, with absolutely no understanding of the scope of work. If they can not prepare a proper Bid Leveling Budget with a complete scope of work how is one going to write a scope letter that supports accurate Bid Leveling? So, the latter scenario begs another question. If a PM takes a sub trades quote early on and haves the sub quote on the project and then takes that quotes narrative and creates a Scope Letter out of it is that Bid Shopping? I honestly think that creating a solid Scope Letter can only be done if one has done a proper takeoff and priced the work out in terms of tradesman hours and equipment resources required to do a task. What say you? Cheers Richard Miller CPE

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Bid Proposal Formats

Posted By Dave Garman, Monday, February 11, 2019
 

I am finding it shocking and amazing how subcontractors and suppliers are submitting their bid proposals in such inconsistent formats.  At my company, we spend a lot of time to put together detailed scope of work bid packages and a bid form for use by subcontractors to submit their bid proposals on our projects.  Unfortunately, many ignore these instructions and submit their bid proposals their own way. 

 

I still receive bid proposals …

·         By fax, even though I personally have not used a fax machine for over 10 years.

·         By e-mail typed within an e-mail and no attachment.

·         By e-mail as a PDF file attachment.

·         By e-mail as a MS Word attachment unprotected so anyone can make changes to their bid proposal. 

·         By e-mail as MS Excel attachments unprotected so anyone can make changes to their bid proposal. 

·         By e-mail with a link to download from an internet cloud somewhere (you have to careful about malware viruses with the download). 

·         To top all that off, many of bid proposals I receive do not have any contact information on them: no contact person name, no telephone number, no company name. 

·         Some bid proposals come in by e-mail; and the e-mail contains the contact information, but they do not put the contact information on the attached bid proposal so unless you print out the e-mail then you have no contact information on their bid proposal.

·         I still occasionally have some subcontractors who (apparently) do not have a computer, so they hand write their bid proposals which sometimes are barely legible. 

·         I have had a couple of subcontractors who work on the jobsite and also do the bid proposals, and they like to occasionally hand deliver their bid proposals.  It’s not unusual for them to hand deliver a bid proposal after working out on a project all day in mud and track mud all over our office to hand deliver their bid personally to my office. 

·         I have one subcontractor who likes to use any scrap piece of paper he can find and submit a lump sum number bid proposal without any scope details on the scrap paper (usually a used napkin where he recently had breakfast or lunch) and hand deliver that to my office.

 

What is shocking is that this inconsistency in bid proposals is coming from a lot of very large reputable subcontractor companies that do very good work on our projects.  What are your challenges in receiving bids?

 

 

Dave Garman, CPE

Standards Committee

 

Tags:  standards 

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