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Opportunities to obtain your PDU's

Posted By Greg Williamson, Wednesday, October 14, 2020

https://www.aecdaily.com/

 

here's a web site with learning programs for any AEP or CPE members that need their PDU's.  Remember, you must complete your annual PDU's by the end of December.

 

you also can accumulate PDUs by attending Regional Meetings - check the calendar for NE and NW/SW upcoming regional meetings

 

FREE

Tags:  certification  education  pdu opportunity 

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Stone Walls: Massachusetts preservation August 19

Posted By Greg Williamson, Wednesday, August 12, 2020

 

Preservation

Conversations

Stone Walls:
How To Identify, Document & Evaluate Them in Historic Landscapes
with guest speaker
Jeff Howry

 

We're coming up on our final Preservation Conversation of the summer (but don't worry, we have some great things planned for the fall!)

This week we will discuss Stone Walls: How To Identify, Document & Evaluate Them in Historic Landscapes with special guest speaker Jeff Howry. Given how popular our last stone wall conversation was, we're pretty excited about next week's presentation, and hope you will be too!

Questions can be emailed to ekelly@preservationmass.org or use the live chat feature during the conversation. For our summer schedule and upcoming topics be sure to check out the PM website.  


And, in case you missed it, our last two conversations are now up on our website and YouTube channel: What is a Circuit Rider and Local Funding Programs for Historic Homeowners.   You will also find referenced documents on our website for each of these presentations. 

Next Conversation
August

19

10:00 - 11:00 AM

 

PM's GoTo Meeting Platform
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/374045893

Click here for more details on how to connect.

 

Upcoming Conversations
 

August 19- Stone Walls: How to Identify, Document & Evaluate Them in Historic Landscapes, with Jeff Howry.

September - Historic Landscape Preservation (date TBD)
 

 

Our Circuit Riders Jeff & Stacia gave some insight into their roles and work for PM and some helpful hints about getting the most out of your outreach to them. 

 

Patrick Guthrie of the Arlington Preservation Fund shared how this local program began and has now made more than 100 loans to owners of historic properties in the community. 

 

Copyright © 2020 Preservation Massachusetts.  All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
The Landmark Building
34 Main Street Extension, Suite 401
Plymouth, MA 02360

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

www.preservationmass.org

Tags:  education 

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FREE WEBINAR: "IMPROVE YOUR ESTIMATING SKILLS WITH CPE CERTIFICATE

Posted By Lorena Quintero, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020
https://willscot.zoom.us/j/95225334373

San Diego Chapter #4 Has an upcoming Free Webinar for All that want to improve Your Estimating Skills with CPE Certificate. July 29, 2020 3:00PM-4:00PM PST https://www.aspesd4.org/ Join from a : PC, Mac, iPhone, iPad, or Android device! Zoom Join Meeting: https://willscot.zoom.us/j/95225334373 Webinar ID: 952 2533 4373 OR JOIN BY PHONE: For Higher quality, dial a number based on your current location: +1 301 715 8592 , +1 929 205 6099 , +1 312 626 6799 , +1 669 900 6833 +1 253 215 8782 , +1 346 248 7799 INTERNATIONAL NUMBERS AVAILABLE - https://willscot.zoom.us/u/awKaV9Wy

Tags:  certification  education  https://willscot.zoom.us/j/95225334373  Market Outlook  membership  new members  sta  standards  whyaspe 

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Architectural Film Finishes

Posted By Deanne Goodlaxson, Wednesday, April 24, 2019
 

The last time that I ran across architectural graphics film was in 2011.  The glazer added it to his scope, which came to $18.00/sf.  It was being applied to an existing window we were building over and not removing for an addition on the second level overlooking a new 2 story lobby.  Small and high up.  Just recently, I came across Architectural Surfaces - AS-1 and AS-2 in a separate Interior Design drawing and materials legend I had to work off for the initial design of a hotel renovation.  I did not have any specifications, just the manufacturer, the sales rep's name and (of course) color.  They were applying it not only to glazing, but to walls and to "upgrade" the existing elevator doors and frames that were to remain in the cast-in-place shear walls.

 

I was scanning articles in CSI's web newsletter and came across this and hoped it would provide insight:

https://www.constructionspecifier.com/uncovering-design-possibilities-with-architectural-film-finishes

 

I had expected to learn where this product is typically specified.  I also was interested in which trade claims it.  Does this change depend upon where applied?  To glass, is it the glazers?  To walls, is it wall covering? To existing elevator doors and frames?   Interiors of elevators?  Who?  Of course, ultimately, I would have really liked to see an in-place cost reference which would help everyone know it’s viable use. 

 

What have you experienced?  What are your best sources for new materials applications and costs?

 

Deanne Goodlaxson, CPE

Education Committee

 

Tags:  education 

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Architectural Film Finishes

Posted By Deanne Goodlaxson, Friday, April 19, 2019
 

The last time that I ran across architectural graphics film was in 2011.  The glazer added it to his scope, which came to $18.00/sf.  It was being applied to an existing window we were building over and not removing for an addition on the second level overlooking a new 2 story lobby.  Small and high up.  Just recently, I came across Architectural Surfaces - AS-1 and AS-2 in a separate Interior Design drawing and materials legend I had to work off for the initial design of a hotel renovation.  I did not have any specifications, just the manufacturer, the sales rep's name and (of course) color.  They were applying it not only to glazing, but to walls and to "upgrade" the existing elevator doors and frames that were to remain in the cast-in-place shear walls.

 

I was scanning articles in CSI's web newsletter and came across this and hoped it would provide insight:

https://www.constructionspecifier.com/uncovering-design-possibilities-with-architectural-film-finishes

 

I had expected to learn where this product is typically specified.  I also was interested in which trade claims it.  Does this change depend upon where applied?  To glass, is it the glazers?  To walls, is it wall covering? To existing elevator doors and frames?   Interiors of elevators?  Who?  Of course, ultimately, I would have really liked to see an in-place cost reference which would help everyone know it’s viable use. 

 

What have you experienced?  What are your best sources for new materials applications and costs?

 

Deanne Goodlaxson, CPE

Education Committee

 

Tags:  education 

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Snippets and Sayings from History

Posted By Chris Ray, Wednesday, April 10, 2019
 
 

Whoever said history was boring?  They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to pee in a pot.  Once a day it was taken and sold to the tannery.  If you had to do this to survive, you were, “piss poor.”  But worse than that were the really poor folks who couldn’t even afford to buy a pot.  They “didn’t have a pot to piss in” and were considered the lowest of the low.

 

Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May and they still smelled pretty good by June.  However, since they were starting to smell, brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor.  Hence, the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting married.

 

Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water.  The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women, and finally the children.  Last of all the babies.  By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.  Hence, the saying, “Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water!”

 

Houses had thatched roofs with thick straw piled high and no wood underneath.  It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof.  When it rained, it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof.  Hence, the saying, “it’s raining cats and dogs.”  There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house.  This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed.  Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection.  That’s how canopy beds came into existence.

 

The floor in most homes were dirt.  Only the wealthy had something other than dirt.  Hence the term “dirt poor”.  The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on the floor to help keep their footing.  As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside.  A piece of wood was placed in the entrance way.  Hence, a “threshold.”

 

In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire.  Every day, they lit the fire and added things to the pot.  They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat.  They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day.  Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there quite a while.  Hence the rhyme, “Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old.”

 

Sometimes they would obtain pork that made them feel very special.  When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off.  It was a sign of wealth that a man could “bring home the bacon.”  They would cut off a little to share with guests, and would all sit around and “chew the fat.”

 

Those with money had plates made of pewter.  Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning death.  This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.

 

Bread was divided according to status.  Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and the guests got the top or “upper crust.”

 

Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky.  The combination would sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days.  Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial.  They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up.  Hence the custom of, “holding a wake.”

 

In old, small villages, local folks started running out of places to bury people.  So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone house and reuse the grave.  When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside, and they realized they had been burying people alive.  So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell.  Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift) to listen for the bell.  Thus, someone could be “saved by the bell” or was considered a “dead-ringer”.

 

Who said history was boring?

 

Anyone have any snippets or sayings related to the history of estimating?

 

 

Chris Ray, CPE

Education Committee

Tags:  education 

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Electric Vehicles: Get Charged Up for How Much?

Posted By Brian Wright, Friday, March 29, 2019
 

As Electric Vehicles become accepted and increasingly affordable, building owners, corporations and retail outlets are installing chargers to help employees and offer customer service to shoppers.

 

As in all estimating, costs per charger have varied widely.  My best case project [these are real life numbers], saw the charger material cost at $5,000 for a dual-cord Charger serving 2 cars with Corporate purchasing leverage, and under $1,500 for GPR to miss the PTS Steel in the concrete, Charger installation and the power run to a Panel Board 10’ away that allowed all surface mount conduit in a Concrete parking deck.  Total cost $6,500 including commissioning. [Best case unit cost to date]

 

A record high cost seen to date is $37,500 per Dual Charger, 2 Dual Chargers were installed.  

 

How could the range be that large and jump from $6,500 each to $37,500 each for a single dual-cord charger?  This was a worst case scenario where an over 200’ underground run through complicated hardscape, landscape, multiple underground utility intersections required multiple demo trades and vacuum truck excavation at close to $100 a foot for 24” width and 18” depth to allow for Structural roadway put back.  The previous reasons, upsized copper for voltage drop as well, and slurry back fill with final complex hardscape and landscaping put back.  One would think Value Engineering would bring this unit cost down; but when you see the dominoes as a Pre Con estimator flow in real life, having a Vacuum Truck worst case scenario unit cost arrow in your estimating quiver at least gives the owner a chance to pause and locate chargers in that low cost concrete parking deck a 1,000 feet away. [A long walk for employees, and they wanted to reward them for being green and buying an Electric vehicle with a prime parking location.]  Serving the customer/employee outweighed install costs, and they went ahead and installed them in the most convenient short walk location but also the most expensive location.

 

The takeaway is all construction needs a Certified Professional Estimator to vision the large cost impact swings before design is placed on costly engineered drawings and allow the Team to make informed decisions as early as possible.

 

Brian Wright, CPE

Chair, Education Committee

Tags:  education 

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Productivity + Use of Phones

Posted By Heather Boulanger, Wednesday, March 27, 2019
 

How do you deal with employees that are constantly checking their phones?

 

We have 3 employees.  I can walk by their offices at any time, and 2 out of 3 times they will be looking down at their phones.  I’m not sure if they are actively texting, handling personal email, just checking in on the multitudes of social media platforms, or what.

 

Have you had to talk to them or discipline employees?  Has your company implemented a policy regarding personal phone use or internet use during company hours?

 

And, to answer the question you are probably asking as your read this, are they getting their job done? Yes; one employee is.  Another employee is doing the bare minimum of tasks, and the third is not.

 

So the one that is getting his job done is not pushing to work harder because he doesn’t need to; all he needs to do is look at the other two (who accomplish less and continue to hold their jobs).

 

Heather Boulanger, CPE

Education Committee

Tags:  education 

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Communication

Posted By Brian Wright, Friday, March 22, 2019
 

As a Coach Trainer for over 100 Construction people, I am often invited to speak and teach on how to improve communication. In our roles, we are constantly required to attend meetings, process change orders, perform field walks, and field phone calls.  We think we had a meeting of the minds, and everything is headed the way we want, as we heard what we wanted to hear for a successful outcome. Communication is often completed in our minds and is also a positive outcome in all attendees.  Without the precious extra 10 minutes it takes to write up meeting minutes and allow others to confirm what was said, not what they wanted to hear, we do not know that everyone heard the same thing.  If a conversation is worth having, take an extra 10 minutes to write the minutes or send a 1 liner email to ensure the meeting of the minds actually happened.

 

Pass a good New Year’s resolutions to document conversations, and the year will have many fewer misunderstandings.  An extra 10 minutes up front saves hours during later punch list walks.

 

Brian Wright, CPE

Chair, Education Committee

Tags:  education 

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Training

Posted By Heather Boulanger, Friday, March 15, 2019
 

I am an estimating professional and proud of it.  I have been an estimator for 38 years.  I have trained many employees and am happy to do so, especially when they get it and become contributing members of my team, helping us to achieve goals together.

 

Heck, I even serve on the Education Committee for ASPE and contribute ideas for programs to help the industry.

 

But, for the love of God, do I have to train every General Contractor’s junior engineer (and then the Architect) on every new project I submit on? 

 

More and more lately, I have had to explain what fireproofing does, why the UL designs on the plans don’t match the materials in the specifications so I can’t use them, why I shouldn’t have to fire rate miscellaneous non-structural steel, and why you can’t build the whole building then call us to do our work.

 

Oh, well, I guess that’s why they keep me around.

 

Heather Boulanger, CPE

Education Committee

Tags:  education 

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